Monthly Newsletter

How to Effectively Calm Kids With Anxiety

It can be challenging to calm a child with anxiety. You may be at a loss on what to say or do in order to calm your child down. Sometimes it is not an easy task, but there are effective ways to help a child cope with what they are feeling. childmind.org lists the various types of ways you can help an anxious child feel better.

  • The goal is not to eliminate anxiety, but to help a child manage it. None of us wants to see a child unhappy, but the best way to help kids overcome anxiety isn't to remove stressors that trigger it. It's to help them learn to tolerate their anxiety and function as well as they can, even when they're anxious. And as a by-product of that the anxiety will decrease or fall away over time.
  • Don't avoid things just because they make a child anxious. Helping children avoid things they are afraid of will make them feel better in the short term, but it reinforces the anxiety over the long run.
  • Express positive-but realistic expectations. You can't promise a child that their fears are unrealistic, but you can express confidence that they are going to be okay, they will be able to manage it, and as they face their fears, their anxiety will drop over time.
  • Respect their feelings. You want to listen and be empathetic, help them understand what they are anxious about, and encourage them to feel that they can face their fears.
  • Don't ask leading questions. Try asking open-ended questions to avoid feeding the cycle of anxiety. ex. "How do you feel about the upcoming test?"
  • Don't reinforce the child's fears. Try to stay calm when your child is around something that makes them nervous. If you stay calm around the thing that makes them fearful, they will worry less because you seem calm and confident.
  • Encourage the child to manage their anxiety. Let your child know that you appreciate the work it takes to manage anxiety in order to do what they need or want to do. It's really encouraging them to engage in life and let the anxiety take it's natural curve.
  • Try to keep the anticipatory period short. When we are nervous about something, the hardest time is before we do it. You should try to reduce the anticipatory period to help ease a child's mind.
  • Think things through with the child. Sometimes it helps to talk through what would happen if their fear came true-how would they handle it? For some kids having a plan can reduce the uncertainty in a healthy effective way.
  • Try to model healthy ways of handling anxiety. Show your child how you cope with anxiety. Show your child how you cope with anxiety during stressful situations, so they will see healthy ways of handling it.

The 7 Different Types of ADD

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) affects over 17 million people in the Untied States. ADD in children and adults can affect all aspects of life. ADD is better understood today then in the past. Did you know that there are 7 types of ADD? The 7 types are: classic, inattentive, over focused, temporal lobe, limbic, ring of fire, and anxious. Listed down below are the behaviors for each type.

Classic ADD

  • Is easily distracted
  • Has difficulty sustaining attention span for most tasks in play, school, or work
  • Has trouble listening when others are talking
  • Has difficulty following through (procrastination) on tasks or instructions
  • Has difficulty keeping an organized area (room, desk, book bag, filing cabinet, locker, etc.)
  • Has trouble with time, e.g., is frequently late or hurried, tasks take longer than expected, projects or homework are "last minute" or turned in late
  • Has a tendancy to lose things
  • Makes careless mistakes, poor attention to detail
  • Is forgetful
  • Is restless or hyperactive
  • Has trouble sitting still
  • Is fidgety, in constant motion (hands, feet, body)
  • Is noisy, has a hard time being quiet
  • Acts as if "driven by a motor"
  • Talks excessively
  • Is impulsive (doesn't think through comments or actions before they are said or done)
  • Has difficulty waiting his or her turn
  • Interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)

Inattentive ADD

  • Daydreams excessively
  • Complains of being bored
  • Appears apathetic or unmotivated
  • Is tired, sluggish, or slow-moving
  • Is spacey or seems preoccupied
  • Is easily distracted
  • Has difficulty sustaining attention span for most tasks in play, school, or work
  • Has trouble listening when others are talking
  • Has difficulty following through (procrastination) on tasks or instructions
  • Has difficulty keeping an organized area (room, desk, book bag, filing cabinet, locker, etc.)
  • Has trouble with time, e.g., is frequently late or hurried, tasks take longer than expected, projects or homework are "last minute" or turned in late
  • Has a tendency to lose things
  • Makes careless mistakes, poor attention to detail
  • Is forgetful

Overfocused ADD

The person has ADD core symptoms, plus:

  • Worries excessively or senselessly
  • Is oppositional and argumentative
  • Has a strong tendency to get locked into negative thoughts, having the same thought over and over
  • Has a tendency towards compulsive behaviors
  • Has a tendency to hold grudges
  • Has trouble shifting attention from subject to subject
  • Has difficulties seeing options in situations
  • Has a tendency to get locked in a course of action, whether or not it is good for him or her
  • Needs to have things done a certain way or becomes upset
  • Is criticized by others for worrying too much

Temporal Lobe ADD

The person had ADD core symptoms, Plus:

  • Has periods of quick temper or rages with little provocation
  • Misinterprets comments as negative when they are not
  • Has a tendency to become increasingly irritable, then explode, then recede, and is often tired after rage
  • Has periods of spaciness or confusion
  • Has periods of panic and/or fear for no specific reason
  • Imagines visual changes, such as seeing shadows or objects changing shapes
  • Frequent periods of deja vu (feelings of being somewhere before even though he or she has never been there
  • Is sensitive or mildly paranoid
  • Experiences headaches or abdominal pain of uncertain origin
  • Has history of a head injury or family history of violence or explosiveness
  • Has dark thoughts, may involve suicidal or homicidal ideas
  • Has periods of forgetfulness or memory problems
  • Has a short fuse or periods of extreme irritability

Limbic ADD

The person has ADD core symptoms, plus:

  • Moodiness
  • Negativity
  • Low energy
  • Frequent irritability
  • A tendency to be socially isolated
  • Frequent feelings of hopelessness, helplessness, or excessive guilt
  • Lowered interest in things that are considered fun
  • Sleep changes (too much or too little)
  • Chronic low self-esteem

"Ring of Fire" ADD

The person has ADD core symptoms, plus:

  • Is angry or aggressive
  • Is sensitive to noise, light, clothes, or touch
  • Has frequent or cyclic mood changes (high and lows)
  • Is inflexible, or rigid in thinking
  • Insists on having his or her own way, even when told no multiple times
  • Has periods of mean, nasty, or insensitive behavior
  • Displays grandiose or "larger than life" thinking
  • Talks fast
  • Has the sensation that thoughts go fast
  • Appears anxious or fearful

Anxious ADD

The person has ADD core symptoms, plus:

  • Frequently anxious or nervous
  • Experiences physical stress symptoms such as headache or stomachache
  • Tends to freeze in social situations
  • Dislikes, or gets excessively nervous public speaking
  • Avoids conflict
  • Fear of being judged

ADD comes in may different forms and can affect people differently. If you want more information on ADD, read Dr. Amen's books, Healing ADD. The breakthrough program that allows you to see and heal the 7 types of ADD and Driven from Distraction.

Are you or someone you know in need of therapy services? We offer individual, couples, and family counseling. Our therapists are trained to work with adults, teens, and children. For more information visit our website at: www.wapcenter.org or call us at: (810) 299-1472


What is Clinical Depression?

Depression ranges in seriousness from mild, temporary episodes of sadness to severe, persistent depression. Clinical depression is the more severe form of depression, also known as major depression or major depressive disorder. It isn't the same as depression caused by a loss, such as the death of a loved one, or a medical condition, such as a thyroid disorder. Clinical depression can be caused by genetic, environmental, or physiological factors in life.

Symptoms of clinical depression:

  • Feelings of sadness, tearfulness, emptiness, or hopelessness.
  • Angry outbursts, irritability, or frustration over small matters.
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in normal day to day activities.
  • Sleeping too little or too much.
  • Lack of energy, even small tasks take a lot of effort.
  • Extreme weight loss due to lack of appetite or extreme weight gain due to increased appetite.
  • Anxiety.
  • Slowed thinking, speaking, or body movements.
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt.
  • Fixating on past failures or self blame.
  • Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions, or remembering things.
  • Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches.
  • Suicidal thoughts.

Clinical depression can take a serious toll on someone and should not be ignored. Symptoms are usually severe enough to cause noticeable problems in relationships with others or in day-to-day activities, such as work, school, or social activities.

Clinical depression can affect people of any age, including children. However, clinical depression symptoms, even if severe, usually improve with psychological counseling, antidepressant medications, or a combination of the two.

Are you or someone you know in need of therapy services? We offer individual, couples, and family counseling. Our therapists are trained to work with adults, teens, and children. For more information visit our website at: www.wapcenter.org or call us at: (810) 299-1472.

Source cited: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/expert-answers/clinical-depression/faq-20057770

What is Social Anxiety?

Social anxiety falls into two categories: Specific and Generalized. An example of specific social anxiety would be the fear of speaking in front of groups. People with generalized social anxiety are anxious, nervous, and uncomfortable in almost all social situations.

People with social anxiety feel distressed in these situations:

  • Being introduced to new people
  • Being teased of criticized
  • Being the center of attention
  • Being watched while doing something
  • Meeting people in authority
  • Most social encounters (especially with strangers)
  • Sharing something around the room with people

These are just a few examples of situations that are stressful for people with social anxiety.

The defining feature of social anxiety is intense fear of being judged or negatively evaluated. The fear is persistent and can affect all aspects of a person's life. The good news is that people with social anxiety can be taught to manage their negative self talk and gain control of their fear. Do not worry, social anxiety can be treated. You can seek a mental health professional who can give you techniques and treatments to treat your social anxiety.

Are you or someone you know in need of therapy services? We offer individual, couples, and family counseling. Our therapists are trained to work with adults, teens, and children. For more information visit our website at: www.wapcenter.org or call us at: (810) 299-1472.

Source used: socialanxietyinstitute.org

January 2019 Newsletter

The Upside of ADHD

ADHD is a misunderstood disorder, kids and adults with ADHD are often given a negative label. We would like to highlight the positive aspects of ADHD.

  • Good at problem solving. Thoughts that bounce back and fourth help people come up with unique solutions to hard problems that people without ADHD sometimes might miss.
  • Imagination and Creativity. People with ADHD tend to think outside of the box which leads to great art and great stories.
  • Hyper-focus. People with ADHD have the ability to focus on something for hours on end without breaking their attention.
  • Ingenuity. People with ADHD might struggle to organize files in alphabetical order, but they come up with their own unique ways to keep organized. Because that's how their brains connect things and work.
  • Willingness to take risks. People with ADHD are willing to take risks more often, which sometimes leads to more adventures and opportunities.
  • Engaging conversational skills. There's rarely any lulls when talking to someone with ADHD. Their constantly racing brain is always coming up with new topics of discussion.
  • Keen memory and observation. Some people with ADHD tend to notice and remember things that other people might miss.

People with ADHD are creative, good problem solvers, imaginative, and have endless energy. Their strengths help them to succeed both personally and professionally.

Are you or someone you know in need of therapy services? We offer individual, couples, and family counseling. Our therapists are trained to work with adults, teens, and children.

Credit to websites used:

https://www.additudemag.com/slideshows/positives-of-adhd/

https://www.additudemag.com/slideshows/benefits-of-adhd-to-love/


December 2018 Newsletter

6 Tips For Managing Sleep Problems and Anxiety

The William A. Presti Center For Families And Youth wishes you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Do you struggle with anxiety and sleep issues? It may surprise you to know that anxiety and sleep issues can go together. When you have stress in your life, it can lead to anxiety because it causes you to worry. When you worry at night, it can lead to disruptive thoughts that throw off your sleep. Here are some tips to help you rest better at night.

1. Exercise- working out has been known to relieve stress and reduce anxiety. It boosts endorphins in your brain that improve your mood. Exercise is good, but try not to work out before you sleep, as it can keep you awake. Exercising in the morning or afternoon can help fix your sleep schedule.

2. Tailor Your Environment- If you adjust the amount of light, noise, and temperature in your sleeping area, it can help you get a better night's rest. Having a dark, cool, and quiet environment can calm your mind and help you fall asleep. Also, taking a shower or a bath right before bed can lower your body temperature and help you fall asleep.

3. Limit Caffeine Intake- Drinking too much caffeine during the day can increase anxiety and disrupt your sleep schedule.

4. Calm Your Mind- If you feel anxious or can't sleep, try mind relaxation techniques. Meditation, yoga, or breathing exercises can help calm your mind. If you practice these techniques during the day, it can be easier to use them at night and fall asleep faster.

5. Limit Screen Time- Your laptop, phone, television, and tablet all emit a light that keeps your brain awake. Try to set an alarm letting you know it's time to put the screens away. Try listening to music or reading a book instead to calm your mind.

6. See a Professional- Seek professional help if you're having trouble sleeping. A therapist can help you find methods to treat anxiety and stress, which will give you calm and rested mind at night.


November 2018

Resentment: What is it?

When people are wounded or put down, hurt and emotional pain are a natural response. Resentment occurs when someone is treated in an unjust way repeatedly by someone over a long period of time. When a person cannot seem to let go of the way someone has hurt them, that hurt can turn into resentment. Resentment occurs when a person's anger develops into something deeper and it doesn't seem to leave. These feelings can lead to anger, unhappiness, depression and anxiety. (Psychology Today)

Why do people hold onto resentment if it ultimately hurts them? Resentment can seem like the just response such as when we stand up to someone when they wrong us. It can give you a feeling of strength and protection. Once resentment has filtered into our lives, it is hard to let it go and often people do not know how to deal with it. Lastly, it can become a part of a person's identity, sometimes without their conscious knowledge. Many times, individuals will continue to carry resentment and show resentful behavior towards others because they are afraid to change. (Psychology Today)

Letting Go of Resentment:

Five Approaches

Put Yourself in Their Shoes

When you think about the person who has hurt you, ask yourself if they may have been treated unjustly by someone in their life. This could be why they are treating others unjustly. They have not learned how to deal with their anger and hurt in a positive way. This may help you deal with your hurt feelings towards the person. (Psychology Today)


Do Not Hurt the Person that Hurt You

Trying to get revenge on people who have hurt you will hurt you more. If you want to develop your own inner strength and compass, try focusing on your own healing process instead of hurting the person in a similar way that they hurt you. (Psychology Today)


Stand in Your Pain and Forgive the Person

Instead of running from your pain or passing it on to another person by treating them poorly, stand in your pain by accepting how this person has harmed you and allow yourself to feel the emotional pain within. This is a healthy process to go through and will make you a stronger person. Forgive the person by offering goodness in response to their unjust actions. This will only help you grow as a person. (Psychology Today)

Reference: Enright, Robert. “Why Resentment Lasts-and How to Defeat It.” Psychology Today, Sussex Publishers, 25 Mar. 2017, www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-forgiving-life/201703/why-resentment-lasts-and-how-defeat-it.